The Pearl and the Crescent: Examining Similarities Between Havana and New Orleans

Curated by J. Marshall Brown

September 21 - November 21, 2016

Opening Reception: Wednesday, September 21 from 5 - 7pm at the Pitot House.

Louisiana Landmarks Society is pleased to announce our Fall Exhibition: The Pearl and the Crescent: Examining Similarities Between Havana and New Orleans, curated by J. Marshall Brown. 

 

When Jean Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville, founded what would become the City of New Orleans in 1718, the City of Havana was already 203-years old. Though founded by rival European empires, the relationship between each city runs deeply throughout history. The interconnections forged through time are reflected on the face of each city, and in New Orleans, the most poignant evidence of the city’s kinship with Havana is reflected in its architecture. The Pearl and the Crescent: Examining Similarities Between Havana and New Orleans looks to shed light on the architectural ancestry of each city and encourage greater awareness about the sister cities of Havana and New Orleans.

 

J. Marshall Brown is a Candidate for the Master of Preservation Studies degree at Tulane University. Originally from a small historic town in the Piedmont of North Carolina, a love for old buildings and old cities came naturally. He holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in urban planning with a special emphasis on historic preservation policy. Realizing that his true passion lies in the restoration and rehabilitation of historic structures, he returned to graduate school and found a perfect fit in the dynamic setting of New Orleans. After a recent trip to study historic preservation in Havana, he developed a keen interest in the island nation’s innovative approach to historic preservation as well as the shared history between Havana and the city he now calls home – New Orleans.